A BRIEF ON THE OPTIMISATION THEORY OF GOD

All of us know if we turn a tumbler filled with water upside down the whole water would fall down. God also very well knew that the tumbler would not hold any water if it was turned upside down. I may explain how I came to the conclusion that he should have certainly known that the whole water of the tumbler is bound to fall down if it is turned upside down.

Just think of the oceans as big tumblers of water. Don’t these tumblers get turned upside down when the earth takes a round around its axis once every 24 hours? How much of the water held by these tumblers falls down when they are upside down – not even a drop of it. Have you ever thought, why? It does not fall out of them only because he believed in the theory of optimisation. He calculated the optimum speeds at which the earth should have revolved around its own axis and around the sun.

Water does not fall out of the oceans because the centripetal force and the centrifugal forces exerted on the water exactly balance each other. But is it not true, the centripetal force and the centrifugal force would have balanced even if the earth would have been revolving a bit slower or a bit faster?

Think a bit, “How big or how small that ‘bit’ could have possibly been?”

Take the extreme limits of the ‘bits’ to understand the whole concept. The earth would have not been revolving at all if this bit would have been too long or it would have been flying at a speed faster than the speed of the light, at the other extreme.

If it would have not been revolving at all, the oceans would have got emptied long back. If it would have been flying faster than the speed of the light no light would have been falling on the earth. So to avoid such catastrophes he went out for an optimum value of the speeds of the earth – approximately 24 hours to go around its axis and approximately 365 days to go around the Sun.

That is the reason why we all should take a lesson on optimisation from the God.

Let us think of Optimisation of Happiness, for instance.

It doesn’t help us being neither much too happy nor much too unhappy in our life. We should strike at an optimum level of happiness. If we restrict ourselves at an optimum value, the water of the tumblers would not fall down even if we turned the tumblers upside down.

You need not argue that the earth revolves around its axis in 23 hours 59 minutes and 56 seconds – not in 24 hours because it takes it 365.24219 days to travel from equinox to equinox, that is, from the time the Sun crosses the celestial equator from south to north to the next time. The number of hours it takes to go around its axis and the number of days it takes to go around the Sun depends on how we have defined the duration of the day, the duration of an hour, the duration of a minute and the duration of a second. He alone should have known how he may have been measuring the time. But it is amply sure that he did not commit any mistake in his calculations of arriving at the appropriate values of the speeds – how fast the earth should have revolved around its own axis or around the Sun.

So on the same logic, we would be better off if we aimed at an optimum level of happiness – neither too much of happiness nor too little of happiness. Of course, it leaves a riddle behind – how do we decide what is too much and what is too little of happiness?

To decide what is too much and what is too little is just like deciding the durations of the day, the hours, the minutes and the seconds.

It would not matter how you defined them as long as you did not commit a mistake just as God did not commit a mistake in calculating the optimum speeds of the earth.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s